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Physical Activity for Different Groups

Physical Activity for Different Groups

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Regular physical activity is one of the most important things people can do to improve their health. Moving more and sitting less have tremendous benefits for everyone, regardless of age, sex, race, ethnicity, or current fitness level. The second edition of the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans

provides science-based guidance to help people ages 3 years and older improve their health through participation in regular physical activity.

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[PDF-432KB]

Preschool-Aged Children (3-5 years)

Physical Activity every day throughout the day.

Active play through a variety of enjoyable physical activities.

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Children and Adolescents (6-17 years)

60 mins (1 hour) or more of moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity daily.

A variety of enjoyable physical activities.

As part of the 60 minutes, on at least 3 days a week, children and adolescents need:

  • Vigorous Activity such as running or soccer.
  • Activity that strengthens muscles such as climbing or push ups.
  • Activity that strengthens bones such as gymnastics or jumping rope.

Learn More

Adults (18-64 years)

At least 150 minutes a week of moderate intensity activity such as brisk walking.

At least 2 days a week of activities that strengthen muscles.

Aim for the recommended activity level but be as active as you are able.

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Older Adults (65 years and older)

At least 150 minutes a week of moderate intensity activity such as brisk walking.

At least 2 days a week of activities that strengthen muscles.

Activities to improve balance such as standing on one foot.

Aim for the recommended activity level but be as active as one is able.

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Adults with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities

Get at least 150 minutes (for example, 30 minutes 5 days a week) of moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity a week.

And

Get at least 2 days a week of muscle- strengthening activities that include all major muscle groups.

If you are unable to meet the recommendations, be as active as you can and try to avoid inactivity.

Learn More

Pregnant and Postpartum Women

Get at least 150 minutes (for example, 30 minutes 5 days a week) of moderate intensity aerobic activity a week such as brisk walking during pregnancy and the postpartum period.

Remember, some physical activity is better than none, so do what you can.

Learn More

Source: Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, 2nd edition

[PDF-14.4MB].

Want Tips and Resources to Help You Stay Active?

Join CDC’s nationwide initiative to help 27 million Americans become more physically active.


Original Article – https://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/basics/age-chart.html

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